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Tag / Universal Reconciliation

God v. The People

According to Scripture, each of us must stand before the judgement seat of God when our time on earth is done. Christians do not contend with this statement. However, there is not a consensus on what follows. Most Christians maintain that there are only two possible outcomes. The first, of which, follows an innocent verdict: […]

The Gates Of Hell Shall Not Prevail

“And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” —Matthew‬ ‭16:18‬ ‭ESV‬‬ This verse, in particular, is one of the most reassuring verses in all the Scriptures. It is a promise—one with which many have found solace. In […]

Upcoming Book: Hell in a Nutshell- The Mystery of His Will (Excerpt)

Pond Scum Theology “Pond-scum theology makes even less sense in the context of  the Gospels. To believe that people are inherently worthless to God strips the incarnation, crucifixion, and resurrection of all their meaning and power. It makes Jesus look like a fool for dying for us, and it leaves behind his followers with little incentive to seek […]

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God?

For some reason, the Church, at large, has come to assume that God’s justice is at odds with his other attributes; as though his justice “must be taken into consideration” whenever his grace, mercy, or love is mentioned. Since this concept is one of the main topics in my book- Hell in a Nutshell- The […]

What about Hitler?

Since I firmly believe in the doctrine of Universal Reconciliation, I am often asked, “Will Hitler be in heaven?” This question is often asked as a rhetorical question. Many assume that the answer is emphatically: No!; if not a “Hell no!” If anyone deserves to suffer forever, it is him. Right?! Although the Bible states […]

Hell In A Nutshell

Hell in a Nutshell (early 2017) challenges the prevalent Christian doctrine of postmortem judgement by calling into question how it effects our understanding of God’s key attributes. Following this detailed examination, Watson skillfully presents his theory that the doctrine of Universal Reconciliation is sound both scripturally and philosophically.